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The Cure - The Disintregation (Deluxe) [2LP]

$38.00

A1 Plainsong 5:15A2 Pictures Of You 7:28A3 Closedown 4:21B1 Lovesong 3:30B2 Last Dance 4:47B3 Lullaby 4:12B4 Fascination Street 5:16C1 Prayers For Rain 6:07C2 The Same Deep Water As You 9:22D1 Disintegration...

SPECIFICATIONS

A1 Plainsong 5:15
A2 Pictures Of You 7:28
A3 Closedown 4:21
B1 Lovesong 3:30
B2 Last Dance 4:47
B3 Lullaby 4:12
B4 Fascination Street 5:16
C1 Prayers For Rain 6:07
C2 The Same Deep Water As You 9:22
D1 Disintegration 8:23
D2 Homesick 7:09
D2 Untitled 6:30

Disintegration is the eighth studio album by British alternative rock band The Cure, released on 2 May 1989 by Fiction Records. The record marks a return to the introspective and gloomy gothic rock style the band had established in the early 1980s. As he neared the age of thirty, vocalist and guitarist Robert Smith had felt an increased pressure to follow up on the group's pop successes with a more enduring work. This, coupled with a distaste for the group's newfound popularity, caused Smith to lapse back into the use of hallucinogenic drugs, the effects of which had a strong influence on the production of the album. The Cure recorded Disintegration at Hookend Recording Studios in Checkendon, Oxfordshire, with co-producer David M. Allen from late 1988 to early 1989. During production, founding member Lol Tolhurst was fired from the band.

Disintegration became the band's commercial peak, charting at number three in the United Kingdom and at number twelve in the United States, and producing several hit singles including "Lovesong", which peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100. It remains The Cure's highest selling record to date, with more than three million copies sold worldwide. It was greeted with a warm critical reception before later being acclaimed, eventually being placed at number 326 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "500 Greatest Albums of All Time". Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic called it the "culmination of all the musical directions The Cure were pursuing over the course of the '80s".

Disintegration was Robert Smith's thematic return to a dark and gloomy aesthetic that The Cure had explored in the early 1980s. Smith deliberately sought to record an album that was depressing, as it was a reflection of the despondency he felt at the time. The sound of the album was a shock to the band's American label Elektra Records; the label requested Smith shift the release date back several months. Smith recalled "they thought I was being 'wilfully obscure', which was an actual quote from the letter [Smith received from Elektra] . Ever since then I realised that record companies don't have a fucking clue what The Cure does and what The Cure means." Despite rumours that Smith was one of the only contributors to the record, he confirmed that more than half of the dozen tracks on Disintegration had substantial musical input from the rest of the band.

Disintegration was released in May 1989 and peaked at number three on the UK Albums Chart, the highest position the band had placed on the chart at that point. In the UK, the lead single "Lullaby" became The Cure's highest charting hit in their home country when it reached number five. In the US, due to its appearance in the film Lost Angels, the band's American label Elektra Records released "Fascination Street" as the first single. The international follow-up single to "Lullaby", "Lovesong", became The Cure's highest charting hit in the United States, when it reached number two on the Billboard charts. The success of Disintegration was such that the March 1990 final single "Pictures of You" reached number 24 on the British charts, despite the fact that the album had been released a year earlier. Disintegration was certified silver (60,000 copies shipped) in the United Kingdom, and by 1992 had sold more than three million copies worldwide.