BackBack

Nirvana - Bleach [LP]

$28.00

Tracklist:A1 Blew A2 Floyd The Barber A3 About A Girl A4 School A5 Love Buzz A6 Paper Cuts B1 Negative Creep B2 Scoff B3 Swap Meet B4 Mr. Moustache B5 Sifting Bleach is the debut studio album by American rock band...

description

Tracklist:

A1 Blew 
A2 Floyd The Barber 
A3 About A Girl 
A4 School 
A5 Love Buzz 
A6 Paper Cuts 
B1 Negative Creep 
B2 Scoff 
B3 Swap Meet 
B4 Mr. Moustache 
B5 Sifting

Bleach is the debut studio album by American rock band Nirvana, released on June 15, 1989 by Sub Pop. The main recording sessions took place at Reciprocal Recording in Seattle, Washington between December 1988 and January 1989.

Bleach was well received by critics, but failed to chart in the U.S. upon its original release. The album was re-released internationally by Geffen Records in 1992 following the success of Nirvana's second album, Nevermind (1991). The re-release debuted at number 89 on the Billboard 200, and peaked at number 33 on the UK Albums Chart and 34 on the Australian albums chart. In 2009 Sub Pop released a 20th anniversary edition of Bleach featuring a live recording of a Nirvana show in Portland, Oregon from 1990 as extra material. Since its release in 1989, Bleach has sold over 1.7 million units in the United States alone. It is Sub Pop's best-selling release to date.

According to Cobain, the music on Bleach conformed with the grunge genre Sub Pop heavily endorsed. "There was this pressure from Sub Pop and the grunge scene to play 'rock music'", Cobain said, and noted that he "stripped it down and made it sound like Aerosmith." Cobain also felt he had to fit the expectations of the grunge sound to build a fanbase, and hence suppressed his arty and pop songwriting traits while crafting the record. Krist Novoselic said in a 2001 interview with Rolling Stone that the band had played a tape in their tour van that had an album by The Smithereens on one side and one by the extreme metal band Celtic Frost on the other, and noted that the combination probably played an influence as well. The songs were described as "deliberately bleak, claustrophobic, and lyrically sparse, with none of the manic derangement or sense of release of the live performance". Cobain said that the song structures were "one–dimensional", and said that he sought to present a more "polished and urbane side of happy".